SECOND SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME

Jesus Calling Us to be a Disciple

John the Baptist’s designation of Jesus as Lamb of God is often misunderstood. It
has little to do with Jesus’ meekness, mildness, or humility and everything to do
with sacrifice, and his unending love for us. “Behold the Lamb of God.” It is
with these words that St. John the Baptist introduces Jesus to two of his followers,
who then in turn do indeed follow Jesus to learn more about Him. One of those
followers is identified as Andrew, brother to St. Peter, and the other is presumed
by historians to be St. John. Throughout his Gospel, St. John appears often, but is
never specifically named.
But why did John the Baptist use that name in particular, “Lamb of God?” Lambs were sacrificed regularly, and the
blood of the lambs given in sacrifice was given for the sins of that day. Of course, the blood of Jesus was given for
our sins, not just for a particular day but for all time.
It is as if each Gospel presents a view of who Jesus is. It is interesting to see how each Gospel emphasizes different
aspects of Jesus. You might say Matthew shows Him as the King of Kings. Mark presents Him as a Servant of God.
Luke views Him as the Son of Man. And John illustrates Jesus as the Son of God. All together the Gospel writers
give us a glimpse of the greatest Man who ever lived. Jesus healed the sick, raised the dead, fed the hungry, and
most importantly loved unconditionally. Jesus has cared for us like no other. No one has ever loved us like Jesus
has.
Jesus asks these first two disciples an important and logical question: “What are you looking for?” It is the same
question He asks of all of us. For the answer the Lord directed them, as He does us as well, to Himself – to live with
Him, to “Come and…see.” Those disciples followed Him. They do this at the urging of John the Baptist. Their
willingness to follow Jesus fulfills John the Baptist’s ministry.
In our own lives, the Gospel calls us to follow Jesus We are called to be Christ’s disciples. People come to faith in
the Lord through invitation. Andrew invites and introduces his brother Simon Peter to Jesus. If we truly believe in
the Lord, and wish to share that belief, we too will invite others to join with us. That is part of our calling.
God even goes further, and asks of us to give our lives over to him, every aspect of our lives. Often, this is a giant
leap of faith, as our lives will change and like Mary, we may not be entirely sure how much it will change until we
say yes.
However, while giving our lives to Christ can be a bit scary perhaps, there is also great joy that we experience. I
was listening to Danny speak last week about his experience with the NET team, and I remember thinking what a
great journey he is on, and what an incredible journey so many people who say “yes” to the Lord have experienced.
If you think church is boring, I can tell you a life of faith is anything but boring. However, no matter how exciting a
life in Christ is, it too will take sacrifice. Sometimes it is a sacrifice of moving to a place you are unfamiliar with
and leaving family and friends, or leaving a job that you are comfortable in, or perhaps we lose friends that just
don’t understand the change that has come over us; the you that they have come to know isn’t quite the same person
anymore. I know in my case, I lost a couple of friends because they had a kind of pre-conceived notion of what a
Catholic believes and does, and they just couldn’t reconcile that. One thing is for sure, Jesus has promised to journey
with you and guide you on this incredible journey of faith, a faith you can share with so many that you encounter.
God bless you all, Deacon Dan MacDonald